Fri. Sep 20th, 2019

The Seer

Read, Think, Act

Book Reviews

4 min read

Through her college, her reading and her exposure to her immediate world, Aliya, is the diplomatic yet empathetic voice in the story who is able to recognize the unfairness in the way in which society treats people, especially women.

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5 min read

There is a concept of performativity in Social Science, where a victim or an oppressed has to ‘perform’ her oppression every time for her to assert her rights. A very simple example would be how a tribal has to prove her backwardness to the authorities to claim their entitled rights. In terms of literature, a women writer has to perform her feminism every time she writes, for there are questions too often which asks her about the ‘women’s perspective’ in her writing.

3 min read

The unconventional bonds that the characters share with each other. While it’s hard to believe such irrational intimacy can exist, the poignancy in Andrew’s narration convinces you otherwise. The biggest and best of all surprises for me was the narrator.

4 min read

As much as the book is a philosophical delight, Kundera’s political dissent which is more than evident is quite an exciting backdrop to the events that unfold in the book. The metaphorical likening of the Communists to Oedipus is one of the best I have read so far.